Stuart "Stugs" Graham

Sadly passed away.

Our dear friend, Stuart, (Stu or Stugs) Graham died of cancer on January 23, aged 63. A Social Science student in 1972, Stuart graduated in Sociology and Politics after three years. He lived first in Alcuin College, where he met his lifelong partner and soul mate, Kit (Pure Maths, 1974), and then shared a house in Bishophill with Kit, Mark Popham, Jane Morgan and Sue Grimsey (who died in 2013). A keen football fan, Stuart temporarily transferred his allegiance from Fulham to York, and could be seen regularly on the terraces at home matches. In December 1975, Stuart married Kit, in the face of considerable family opposition. It was a testament to his powers of reconciliation that his in-laws took less than a year to appreciate what a good marriage he was building with and for Kit. Paul was born in 1981, followed shortly by Peter.
Although there were spells in Leeds studying for his Masters, and working in Buxton, Stuart and Kit settled in Coalbrookdale, near Ironbridge. There he was able to combine his passions for football, politics and beer, both in the local pub and at home, entertaining friends with good food and conversation in the garden of their very welcoming home. Following early retirement, Stuart and Kit indulged a passion for travel: New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Barbados, but above all Scotland, where they were hiking as late as October last year.
At the end of that month, however, Stuart was diagnosed with terminal cancer: he died at home, with Kit singing to him and holding his hand, a true romance to the end. Stuart was a warm, kind, funny and, above all, a gentle man,  a good friend to us, a great husband to Kit and supportive father to Paul and Peter. He was an enthusiastic member of our 1975 reunion group and we, its remaining members, will miss him dreadfully.
Antonia Forte
Rosie Littlechild
Jane Morgan
Mark Popham
Paul Bennell
Melanie Tebbutt
Donald Rae

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Anthony/Tony ("Scouse") Foulkes

Sadly passed away.

Anthony/Tony (“Scouse”) Foulkes Vanbrugh Physics BA (Hons) 2(1)1975 06/04/1954 – 21/02/2018. Tony died of Sepsis and other complications in February this year and was given a good send off at Macclesfield and Buxton by his old University friends and family. He leaves behind a son Michael and a daughter Laura. He was very popular and will be greatly missed.

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Professor Peter Venables

Sadly passed away.

It is with great sadness that the Department of Psychology announces the death of Professor Peter Venables, founder of the Department and former Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University.

Professor Venables was a pioneer of the application of physiological measures to psychological questions with a particular focus on clinical and developmental issues. His perspective was influential in establishing the experimental and biological flavour of research and teaching in Psychology at York, which remains to this day.

His early work foreshadowed the growth of cognitive neuroscience as a discipline and he founded the British Psychophysiological Society, which went on to become the British Association for Cognitive Neuroscience.  He became a world-leading authority on schizophrenia and made important and diverse contributions to the cognitive, neuroanatomical, and neurodevelopmental understanding of that condition. He remained research‑active into his 90s. In May 2015, he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the British Psychological Society. He published his last three papers in 2017.

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Ralph Lambert

Sadly passed away.

Former graduate Ralph Lambert passed away peacefully on 9 May with his family by his side. He read Politics, Sociology and Economics in his first year, selecting the latter as his final subject.

A passionate Evertonian, Ralph played for the university and Goodricke football teams.

He was liked by all; intelligent, interesting, humorous, interested in others and having a desire for fairness and reason. With a cup of coffee going cold by his side, his sometimes relaxed demeanour belied a strength and determination that were his hallmark.

After York he travelled to Australia and New Zealand, followed by a career with Metal Box and its subsequent guises where he moved from financial roles to responsibility for operations in Africa, the Middle East and finally Vice President – Eastern Europe.

Ralph was devoted to Helen whom he married in 1984. Helen has been wonderfully supportive throughout Ralph’s periods of ill-health. They were blessed with two daughters, Anna and Josie. Josie was due to marry in August but hastily rearranged her wedding and Ralph was able to walk her up the aisle only two weeks before he died.

His interests were wide-ranging and coupled with an appetite for knowledge and for seeking out the ‘why’.

Ralph made many friends along the way and will always remain a special friend deeply loved by all the Yorkists who were lucky enough to have known him. The companionship started during York days is captured in the accompanying photo taken on a bench in York city centre in 1970. Submitted by Peter Hill, Goodricke 1972, BA Maths/Computation.

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Dr Peter Lee

Sadly passed away.

Dr Peter Lee was a member of the Department of Mathematics at The University of York from 1972 until his retirement in 2005.  Read an article looking back at Dr Lee’s life by Professor Tony Sudbery.

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Anabel Inge

Publication:

The Making of a Salafi Muslim Woman: Paths to Conversion

The spread of Salafism―often referred to as Wahhabism―in the West has intrigued and alarmed observers since the attacks of 9/11. Many see it as a fundamentalist interpretation of Islam that condones the subjugation of women and fuels Jihadist extremism. This view depicts Salafi women as the hapless victims of a fanatical version of Islam. Yet in Britain, growing numbers of educated women―often converts or from less conservative Muslim backgrounds―are actively choosing to embrace Salafism’s literalist beliefs and strict regulations, including heavy veiling, wifely obedience, and seclusion from non-related men. How do these young women reconcile such difficult demands with their desire for university education, fulfilling careers, and suitable husbands? How do their beliefs affect their love lives and other relationships? And why do they become Salafi in the first place?

Anabel Inge has gained unprecedented access to Salafi womens groups in the United Kingdom to provide the first in-depth account of their lives. Drawing on more than two years of ethnographic fieldwork in London, she examines why Salafism is attracting so many young Somalis, Afro-Caribbean converts, and others. But she also reveals the personal dilemmas they confront. This ground-breaking, lucid, and richly detailed book will be of vital interest to scholars, policy-makers, journalists, and general readers.

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Mel Small

Publication:

Holmes Volume 1 - Sherlock Holmes: Enigma, Detective, Boro Lad

Six short stories inspired by the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. What if Sherlock Holmes, with his dry wit and natural predilection for data, deduction and logic, had been born on Teesside and lived in present-day Middlesbrough?

This smart-arse Boro lad hides his talents under a bushel of misdirection, self-deprecation and good old Teesside sarcasm, served up with some rather coarse language.

With the assistance of his associate, Doctor John Watson, a psychologist he met during some court-ordered counselling sessions, Holmes wends his way through a string of adventures, baffling and entertaining as he goes, with many a three-pint problem solved over his favourite libation, a pint of Engineer’s Thumb in the Twisted Lip, before he staggers back to Flat 1B, 22 Baker Street, Middlesbrough.

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Catherine Rousseau-Jones

Update:

The Archaeology leavers of 1992 are planning to hold a reunion in summer 2017. Details to be confirmed. All 1992 Archaeology/Archaeology-History graduates (and staff who remember us) welcome.

Contact Cath for more details at c.rousseaujones@aol.co.uk.

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Stan Higgins

Award:

EU Cluster Manager of the Year 2014–16

What was it for:

Stan Higgins, chief executive of the North East Process Industry Cluster at Wilton, fended off competition from across the continent to win the prestigious title. The boss of Teesside-based NEPIC has been named European Cluster Manager of the Year 2014. The award was made by the European Commission.

The Award honours cluster managers in Europe for outstanding success stories and was open to every cluster manager in Europe to apply.

Stan, who was a runner-up in 2010 competition, said: “I am so immensely proud of the work of the 22-strong NEPIC team. Unlike the majority of cluster bodies across the EU we get zero financial support of cluster management from the UK Government so to win this prestigious international award says a huge amount about the way NEPIC is perceived internationally.

“This award reflects hugely on the support NEPIC gets from industry locally and from our international partners. Well done to my cluster colleagues who were also nominated for this award.”

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Ian St John

Publication:

The Historiography of Gladstone and Disraeli

The Historiography of Gladstone and Disraeli traces the often sharply differing perspectives historians have formed on key incidents in the careers of the two foremost politicians of the Victorian age – Gladstone and Disraeli. It follows the parallel careers of the two men, focusing on a series of contentious questions, ranging from why Disraeli opposed Corn Law repeal in 1846 and why Gladstone abandoned his High Tory politics for Peelism, to whether Disrsaeli was truly an imperialist and why Gladstone took up the cause of Irish Home Rule. By juxtaposing the contrasting interpretations of historians, the book illustrates how history is a continually evolving subject in which every generation poses new questions or reformulates answers to old ones – encouraging students to realize that history is an ongoing dialogue to which they are called upon to contribute.

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Ben Macpherson

New role:

Member of the Scottish Parliament

Elected as the constituency MSP for Edinburgh Northern and Leith, for the SNP.

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Ava Easton

Publication:

Life After Encephalitis – A Narrative Approach

Life After Encephalitis provides a unique insight into the experiences of those affected by encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain. I share the rich, perceptive, and often powerful, narratives of survivors and family members. It shows how listening to patient and family narratives can help us to understand how they make sense of what has happened to them, and also help professionals better understand and engage with them in practice. The book will also be useful for considering narratives associated with brain injuries from other causes, for example traumatic brain injury.

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