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Oliver Comins

Publication:

Oak Fish Island

Oliver Comins has published his first, long anticipated, full-length book of poetry called ‘Oak Fish Island.’ A selection of twentieth century work is included plus many previously uncollected poems written more recently.

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Natasha Bell

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Exhibit Alexandra

Alexandra Southwood is missing. Her husband is beside himself, or at least he appears to be. She has vanished into thin air; the only traces left are her bloodied clothes by the riverside. It isn’t long before the police are searching for a body.

But we know that she is alive. That she is being kept somewhere far from her family. That perhaps this wife and mother wasn’t quite what she seemed . . .

Be warned: this isn’t another missing-woman thriller. This is something far more shocking . . .

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Peter Aylmer

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Discover a wilder side to London with this guidebook of 25 walks in and around the capital’s green spaces and nature reserves. Covering both central and Greater London, they explore woods and forests, royal parks and heaths, canals and rivers. The walks range from 4 to 14 miles and take up to six hours to complete.
London is a city of 8 million people and 8 million trees, and its vast open spaces are home to 13,000 species of wildlife. This guide takes in all four corners including Epping Forest, Hampstead Heath, the World Heritage site of Kew Gardens and Wimbledon Common and showcases a greener, more gentle side to the city.
Using the rivers as a guide, the book is divided into four sections, and includes a wealth of information about the wildlife, history and conservation of each area. Each walk is illustrated with an OS map at a scale of 1:25,000, and includes a route description, public transport information and photos. There is also a handy route summary table.

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Alexis Willett and Jennifer Barnett

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How Much Brain Do We Really Need?

Your brain is shrinking. Does it matter?

How Much Brain Do We Really Need? challenges us to think differently about the brain. Rather than just concentrating on the many wonderful things it can do, this entertaining insight into the complexities and contradictions of the human brain asks whether in fact we can live satisfactorily without some of it.

The bad news is that our brains start to shrink from our mid-thirties. But the good news is that we still seem to generally muddle along and our brain is able to adapt in extraordinary ways when things going wrong.

Alexis Willett and Jennifer Barnett shed light on what the human brain can do – in both optimal and suboptimal conditions – and consider what it can manage without. Through fascinating facts and figures, case studies and hypothetical scenarios, expert interviews and scientific principles, they take us on a journey from the ancient mists of time to the far reaches of the future, via different species and lands.

Is brain training the key to healthy ageing? Do women really experience baby brain? Is our brain at its evolutionary peak or do we have an even more brilliant future to look forward to? We discover the answers to these questions and more.

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Anabel Inge

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The Making of a Salafi Muslim Woman: Paths to Conversion

The spread of Salafism―often referred to as Wahhabism―in the West has intrigued and alarmed observers since the attacks of 9/11. Many see it as a fundamentalist interpretation of Islam that condones the subjugation of women and fuels Jihadist extremism. This view depicts Salafi women as the hapless victims of a fanatical version of Islam. Yet in Britain, growing numbers of educated women―often converts or from less conservative Muslim backgrounds―are actively choosing to embrace Salafism’s literalist beliefs and strict regulations, including heavy veiling, wifely obedience, and seclusion from non-related men. How do these young women reconcile such difficult demands with their desire for university education, fulfilling careers, and suitable husbands? How do their beliefs affect their love lives and other relationships? And why do they become Salafi in the first place?

Anabel Inge has gained unprecedented access to Salafi womens groups in the United Kingdom to provide the first in-depth account of their lives. Drawing on more than two years of ethnographic fieldwork in London, she examines why Salafism is attracting so many young Somalis, Afro-Caribbean converts, and others. But she also reveals the personal dilemmas they confront. This ground-breaking, lucid, and richly detailed book will be of vital interest to scholars, policy-makers, journalists, and general readers.

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Mel Small

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Holmes Volume 1 - Sherlock Holmes: Enigma, Detective, Boro Lad

Six short stories inspired by the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. What if Sherlock Holmes, with his dry wit and natural predilection for data, deduction and logic, had been born on Teesside and lived in present-day Middlesbrough?

This smart-arse Boro lad hides his talents under a bushel of misdirection, self-deprecation and good old Teesside sarcasm, served up with some rather coarse language.

With the assistance of his associate, Doctor John Watson, a psychologist he met during some court-ordered counselling sessions, Holmes wends his way through a string of adventures, baffling and entertaining as he goes, with many a three-pint problem solved over his favourite libation, a pint of Engineer’s Thumb in the Twisted Lip, before he staggers back to Flat 1B, 22 Baker Street, Middlesbrough.

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Ian St John

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The Historiography of Gladstone and Disraeli

The Historiography of Gladstone and Disraeli traces the often sharply differing perspectives historians have formed on key incidents in the careers of the two foremost politicians of the Victorian age – Gladstone and Disraeli. It follows the parallel careers of the two men, focusing on a series of contentious questions, ranging from why Disraeli opposed Corn Law repeal in 1846 and why Gladstone abandoned his High Tory politics for Peelism, to whether Disrsaeli was truly an imperialist and why Gladstone took up the cause of Irish Home Rule. By juxtaposing the contrasting interpretations of historians, the book illustrates how history is a continually evolving subject in which every generation poses new questions or reformulates answers to old ones – encouraging students to realize that history is an ongoing dialogue to which they are called upon to contribute.

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Ava Easton

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Life After Encephalitis – A Narrative Approach

Life After Encephalitis provides a unique insight into the experiences of those affected by encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain. I share the rich, perceptive, and often powerful, narratives of survivors and family members. It shows how listening to patient and family narratives can help us to understand how they make sense of what has happened to them, and also help professionals better understand and engage with them in practice. The book will also be useful for considering narratives associated with brain injuries from other causes, for example traumatic brain injury.

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Andrea Micocci

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A Historical Political Economy of Capitalism

In order to understand the resilience of capitalism as a mode of production, social organization, and an intellectual system, it is necessary to explore its intellectual development and underlying structure. A Historical Political Economy of Capitalism argues that capitalism is based on a dominant intellectuality: a metaphysics. It proposes the construction of a history-based “critique of political economy”, capable of revealing the poverty of capitalism’s intellectual logic and of its application in practice. This involves a reconsideration of several classical thinkers, including Smith, Marx, Berkeley, Locke, Hobbes, Hume, and Rousseau.

For 20% discount, follow the link and enter the code FLR40 at checkout.

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David Tallerman

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Patchwerk

Patchwerk is my fifth published work, a science-fiction novella released in January of this year by Tor.com. Patchwerk follows scientist Dran Florrian as he flees a futuristic New York with his greatest invention, the machine known as Palimpsest. Confronted by a familiar enemy hellbent on stealing and corrupting his work, Dran discovers that even he only partially understands what he’s created – and that the very fundament of reality may be at stake if he should fail to keep it out of the wrong hands.

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Emily Perkins (nee Murdoch)

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Conquered Hearts

A historical fiction saga that sweeps across two countries through the eyes of a family, Conquered Hearts tells of the heartache and confusion that befell England after the Norman Conquest.

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Loralee Leavitt

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Candy Experiments

Make giant gummi worms, turn M&Ms into dazzling comets, grow candy crystals, and turn cotton candy into slime! You’ll find all these experiments and more, plus simple scientific explanations, in the book Candy Experiments. Learn how to separate candy colors, make candy cane stripes in bowls of water, sink marshmallows, and float taffy. Each experiment includes color photos and scientific explanations. Children will love experimenting with their candy, and they’ll learn something, too!

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